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and what this could mean for u.s. forces. we're also standing by for a statement from the secretary of state hillary clinton. we're also standing by for a statement from the nato secretary-general in brussels. stand by for that. >>> moammar gadhafi is still on the attack, on this the sixth night of pounding by the coalition forces. an explosion and anti-aircraft fire echos in tripoli just a little while ago. could the outrageous failure at reagan happen again? the fallout, the danger at two planes coming in for a landing radioed the control tower and got no answer. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the breaking news. the united states may be closer to giving up its lead role in the fight to protect lickance from gadhafi's forces. right now there's new uncertainty, though, about a tentative deal for nato to take command of the mission. we have lots of questions about how this might play out and how it might affect the overall goal of seeing gadhafi go away. the secretary of state hillary clinton will make a statement a little more that an hour from no
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
, be careful over there. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> u.s. officials say the defection shun of libya's foreign minister shows pressure is having an effect. moussa koussa led to london yesterday. hes the highest ranks official to break with the regime. he once serve as the intelligence chief, and has secrets to tell. the british prime minister says there's no deal of any kind to give moussa koussa immunity. joining us from tripoli, nic robertson. nic, you're getting some reaction from the libyan government on the defection shun of the foreign minister moussa koussa. >> reporter: we haven't had a reaction from the top, gu the government is saying they allowed him to deeffect, because of health reasons. they said he had a heart condition, but it's very clear from the fact that it took them limb 24 hours to respond to the defection that they didn't know it was coming. the government's trying to put the best face on it that they can, but it rings hollow. moussa koussa tricked this government, tricked the leadership and has left the country and left them hanging, wolf. >> how sign
. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism because it's never been enough. rather a partnership of collaboration between latin america and the
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
up to speed on march 31st. >>> u.s. intelligence source says cia operatives are on the ground in libya today to size up rebel fighters. the source says they are not there for battlefield direction. congress asked defense secretary robert gates about the cia story a short time ago. >> do you see the use of cia and u.s. special forces in libya as following the blueprint we used in afghanistan? >> first of all, i can't speak to any cia activities, but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states' military there will be no boots on the ground. >> britain says it has not promised immunity to libya's top diplomat. foreign minister moussa koussa defected wednesday. they say this man moi be a treasure trove of information. >> reporter: it's significant for many reasons, not the least of which he was former head of intelligence. not least of which is because he was at one time a wanted figure by european security services. this is a man whose disappearance here wasn't even known by the deputy foreign minister. >> libyan rebels remain in ful
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
to step down. but in an exclusive interview, libyan's colonel gaddafi came out fighting. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. said that he was delusional. >> it was colonel gaddafi's first interview since this crisis started. he agreed to see bbc news and the sunday times. he said that the u.n.sanction resolutions against libyan were illegitima illegitimate. and asked if he would leave the country. [laughter] as if anyone would leave their home land, he said. >> mr. gaddafi, you have been known as the leader, and for years. and plenty of people in this country would say that the biggest obstacle of change for them and libya is you. >> he said that his presence actually instigated change for the people. >> in recent years you have had important western leaders like tony blair coming here. and now there are western leers leaders saying you should go. >> of course it's betrayal, they have no morals, besides if they want me to step down, what do i step down from? i am not a monarch or king. >> but you can step down even if you don't have a formal title. >> it's honor, he said, nothing to
, one possibility an all-out u.s. assault. that i think the president doesn't want to do, promised the nation he wouldn't do that but how do you turn this thing around on the ground? and there's no -- increasingly, the pessimism is setting in on that front. so it's the other alternative. we don't yet see regime change, but as you just reported we've now seen a regime crack and the biggest -- the best bet for the administration increasingly is the regime will crack from within. >> the question there, david, does gadhafi see the defection of a long-term close comfortanf and say i need to read that tea leave as go or lash out and then the question is what happens? and to your point about, you know, maybe the president is being advised he needs to do more than this but now they're telling congress, $40 million a week which is a lot of money but in the scope of a big military intervention a lot less money than iraq or afghanistan. if they commit to that backseat role but then gadhafi sits there, don't they need could to come back and say never mind, we need to up this? >> yeah, i think
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
. clearly they need help but u.s. defense secretary says countries other than the u.s. can step in with training. robert gates is on capitol hill amid new revelations of cia people gathering facts and cultivating contacts on the battlefield. here's a bit of what he told the house arms services committee. >> i can't speak to any cia activities but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states military, there will be no boots on the ground. >> now i want to show you a libyan city that's far from rebel territory but a battleground in every sense. misrata, which we've already mentioned there in yellow. almost from the start of this uprising, misrata has been under siege from government tank, artillery, even snipers. an independent reporting has been all but impossible in fact we don't even know who controls misrata anywhere but cnn's frederik pleitgen managed to enter the city yesterday and when he found, well you will have to see from yourself. fred, joins us from a ship not far from the misrata port. fred, tell us about your odyssey the
is preparing to take over the military campaign against mullah omar el gadhafi. how big a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge and with war fatigue setting in and criticism coming from both sides of the aisle, president obama will explain what's at stake in libya in an address to the nation on monday evening. plus, fear of spreading terrorism there where anti-government demonstrations and in some cases violence in many arab countries today. in yemen, thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if that president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? plus, with hispanics making up one out of every six americans and one out of every four children, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. >>> finally,
is preparing to take over the military campaign against moammar gadhafi. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's at stake in libya for the united states? the white house will address is monday evening. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the
investors in the u.s. as we just discussed, oil prices keep on spiking up another 2.7% yesterday. this is the increase in oil closing at just under $100 a barrel here in the united states. it was higher than that last week, but it has been in that area for a while. as a result of that, take a look at what happened in stock markets. the dow took a big hit, down 168 points. we also heard from federal reserve chairman ben bernanke who expressed concern about the economic recovery if the price of oil keeps climbing. >>> also, democrats south of the border in wisconsin still staying away in illinois. and the governor of wisconsin unveiling his new state budget, which includes cuts to schools and local municipalities. and the protests will continue at the capitol. the governor planned to cut compensation and collective bargaining rights for union work sti ers. cnn's david mattingly is live in madison, wisconsin. any movement on either side? is there any hope of resolving this? or are we seeing more of the same today, david? >> well, kiran, we're approaching the two-week mark of that da
it comes to how the u.s. would get involved in, say, a syria or a yemen or pbahrain. it seems as if officials today, the whole goal of this briefing was to make sure reporters understood that libya was not a precedent for anything. >> well, it was very striking this weekend on "meet the press" to watch secretary gates and secretary clinton trying to define first from the defense secretary, defining what is in our national interests. this was gates first and then clinton. >> no, i don't think it's vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people would hear that and say that's quite striking. not in our vital interests and yet we're committing military resources to it. >> but then it wouldn't be fair to what bob just said. did hib ilibya attack us? no, they did not attack us. >> but they did have interest with our allies and our allies have been standing with the united states in afghanistan for a decade when they were not attacked. so that's the cas
fighting they captured a key city and held by punishing air strikes from u.s. and coalition forces. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richened engel is on the ground. richard, good morning. >> good morning, lester. we are on the outskirts of ajdabiya. this town clearly taken by the rebels and with considerable help. you can see beind me one of gadhafi's tanks that was obliterated by air strikes. the rebels have pushed about 50 miles to the west of here. so, advancing their frontline in the past 24 hours or so. they say they will continue this until they can reach some more gadhafi-held territory. this is a rebel now counteroffensive under way, assisted by the western airstrikes. lester? >> richer, the nato officials say they're not trying to actively assist the rebels but in trying to protect civilians. their bombs are helping. how far can the rebels advance and is gadhafi's army, in fact, crumbling? >> gadhafgadhafi's army certain this area is crumbling. when you look on the ground, we've seen 20 armored vehicles destroyed from the air. it seems this is not just a defensive operatio
with rear admiral gerald huber providing an update on the situation in libya as well as the u.s. military action against government forces there. live from the pentagon. >> we're going to amp up the volume a little bit and then we'll be ready to go. we're here at the pentagon and we're pleased to be joined today by navy rear admiral girard p. huber u.s. naval forces europe and africa, director for policy resources and strategy. admiral huber is here to give a view on an operational update be it phone link again once again as yesterday from the uss mount whitney afloat in the mediterranean. admiral huber became the director of policy resources and strategy at u.s. naval forces europe and africa in august of 2009. he is currently the chief of staff for joint task force odyssey dawn, the task force established to provide operational and tactical international response to the unrest in libya and enforcement of u.n. security council resolution 1973. with that, admiral, i'll turn things over to you. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you, dave. thank you for the opportunity to talk about joint
need the assistance of the u.s. and coalition forces in order to push back the advances of the libyan government troops, in particular when they were making the major advancement on benghazi, which officials here said would have cost the lives of tens of thousands of innocent civilians. will they need to be armed now in order to push gadhafi out? well, the president yesterday in one of those sit-down interviews again saying they're not ruling anything out or ruling anything in, but he said that question is being assessed. take a listen. >> one of the questions that we want to answer is, do we start getting to a stage where gadhafi's forces are sufficiently degraded where it may not be necessary to arm opposition groups, but we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> reporter: now, aides here at the white house seem to feel that it there is progress being made there because of the pressure that's being applied in this phase two of the operation there, which is now being led by nato, brooke. >> because of the pressure being we know time is of the essence. so how long woul
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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